The Breadwinner is remarkable in multiple ways, and shows again just how important animation is to modern day cinema.

Known for producing films with a very basic yet stunning visual style, studio Cartoon Saloon and director Nora Twomey have taken their individuality one step further with The Breadwinner, as it adapts its original text into a truly emotional and powerful feature length animation.

Parvana (Saara Chaudry) is a young girl in Kabul trying to help her family any way she can. As the only member able to aid her father with his market trade, she often sits with him pushing sales. Yet, when he is taken away, she must step up and earn the money for the family, going to great lengths to provide for them any way she possibly can.

After a slow start, The Breadwinner manages to pull together a plethora of emotions in a complete state of defiance, offering up a great take on feminism, oppression in Afghanistan and above all else a great story. It becomes a thoroughly engaging watch as Parvana is thrust into responsibility and adulthood in a society where she is continually unaccepted.

The Breadwinner

The two styles of animation compliment each other beautifully with its recurring themes of dreams and goals seeping into the positivity of the film. The subject doesn’t necessarily allow for such positivity, but it opens doorways to a constructive future which seems to be The Breadwinner’s main message.

It doesn’t post the same cute and contained attitude of Cartoon Saloon’s former feature films, instead expanding into a wider world with more serious, almost adult themes. However it still manages to supply thrilling excitement in a thoroughly engaging manner, whilst holding onto a keen sense of wonder. The Breadwinner is remarkable in multiple ways, and shows again just how important animation is to modern day cinema.

4/5

Donate £1 To Help Us Keep Going

£1.00

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: