Mission Impossible: Fallout

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Rarely do action films manage to enthral with both the stunts and the story and that makes Fallout a welcome breath of fresh air

There are a number of very positive adjectives that do not easily attach themselves to the majority of modern day action films. We as an audience, are constantly spoiled with a continuous run of boring, explosion filled features that don’t actually take into account what modern day audiences find impressive. However, Mission Impossible seems to be the one huge exception to the norm, particularly after the introduction of Simon Pegg in MI: 3, and takes its extremes, and stunts, to the very top level.

Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) is tasked with removing three cases of plutonium from an international organised terrorist group, known to be planning extreme explosions in three separate locations across the planet. Hunt must act fast, and after his initial attempt ends with the cases in the wrong hands, he is forced into a partnership with August Walker (Henry Cavill), a CIA agent with very different methods of working.

Mission Impossible Fallout

Fallout manages to make death defying stunts seem natural, and the flowing process that leads the story methodically through the film is the sole reason that it works so well. Rarely do action films manage to enthral with both the stunts and the story and that makes Fallout a welcome breath of fresh air.

The chemistry between Cruise, Pegg and Rhames is as good as ever, and Henry Cavill is an excellent addition, putting real muscle into an franchise filled with slippery characters. The twists and turns of the plot are almost halted by his brutish nature, giving Fallout a strange, but fully working, set of competitive notions.

Audiences will go for the stunts, but love the story equally, and that is the true sign of a great movie. Negating genre cliches and plot struggles, Mission Impossible: Fallout is an original piece that will please all of its previous fans, and spur up a horde of brand new ones.

5/5

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