The Miseducation Of Cameron Post

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The story is able to offer up a young and naive look at what these camps exist for, and exactly why they shouldn’t exist

In spite of its 1990’s setting, The Miseducation Of Cameron Post is far more topical than it should be, and this extra, politically charged edge, gives the film real intent and purpose. Based in a gay conversion therapy centre, the divisive set of characters offer a battle of opinions providing insight into what makes true mental strength.

Cameron Post (Chloe Grace Moretz) is caught exploring her sexuality at her high school prom, and deemed wrong and inappropriate by even those close to her. Seen as a case for change, Cameron is sent to live in a Christian conversion camp where she is expected to force herself to change her sexuality. Surrounded by similarly struggling young adults, the group is full of confused individuals with suppressed and denied personalities.

By using Cameron as the point of interest, the story is able to offer up a young and naive look at what these camps exist for, and exactly why they shouldn’t exist. ‘Miseducation’ naturally has an ambiguous usage but it goes a long way to explaining the film’s message, pointing out exactly how important an education is socially, not just academically.

The underlying combination of themes and ideas that are blanketed by Cameron’s naivety is what makes The Miseducation Of Cameron Post so compelling. There’s a real feeling that what these young adults are being forced to endure is so horrifically unnatural. Driven by it unique characters, the way these individuals interact becomes the basis of director Desiree Akhavan’s message, particularly those of Reverend Rick, a man who was previously converted in a similar process.

It’s an entirely convincing film that celebrates the joy of diversity as much as it shows its awareness of terrible ignorance. Using such emotionally aware young actors, Chloe Moretz included, allows for this message to be delivered pertinently and poignantly. The way the message is displayed so evidently, whilst still gripping onto childhood joy and happiness, is an absolute credit to Akhavan.

4/5

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