The Old Man And The Gun is perhaps the best character piece released this year, proving story isn’t everything

Director David Lowery has perfectly captured the style of late 70’s cinema with a sombre, calm and attractive film focusing on Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford), a 70-year-old gentleman with an obsession for robbing banks. Hitting multiple branches a day, Tucker is wanted across the state of Texas, miraculously evading capture at every turn.

With a fitting name, The Old Man And The Gun is an incredibly leisurely film, driven by its thirst for taste and style, looking to avoid stereotypes and become a truly unique feature. The grainy cinematography and focus on well-groomed, elegant characters gives off a high-class impression despite its subject matter. Being such an original story, Lowery and Redford clearly had a lot to play with, both choosing to express emotions classically, with an equally apt script written by Lowery.

The Old Man And The Gun

It certainly isn’t the most interesting of films, with often little more happening than Redford walking into a bank, or showing is good natured personality, but this leaves a lot of room for Lowery’s vision to seep from the production, becoming a very visual piece with a great sense of mood and character.

The Old Man And The Gun’s score is noticeably brilliant, backing the majority of the film with small loops and calm sequences giving it an overtly fantastical feel. There’s a quiet air of superiority about the way it plays out, judged perfectly to stop it seeming arrogant or over bearing. Without any real issues, The Old Man And The Gun is perhaps the best character piece released this year, proving story isn’t everything, and an actor so close to retirement can still pull out brilliant performances.

4/5

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