How To Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

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Maybe proposing it’s as good as Toy Story is a step too far, but in reality, there doesn’t actually seem to be any valid arguments against suggesting exactly that

Supply of fresh-sounding adjectives with the capability of describing the state of modern animation is running out. Frequently and consistently, the top animation studios, and even some of those lesser-known, are able to release projects that hit the bulls-eye each and every time. For a long time the Toy Story trilogy has been the benchmark for these incredible films, but, with the imminent release of Toy Story 4, and How To Train Your Dragon’s finale being as good as it is, there may well be a new #1 in town.

Hiccup (Jay Baruchel),now leader of the viking clan, has turned Berk into a dragon haven. Vibrant but overpopulated, a new home is beckoning; a home with more room for both dragons and vikings alike. However, as the clan set out to find their new residence, the infamous dragon hunter Grimmel (F. Murray Abraham) sets out with one aim: kidnap, and kill, Toothless.

The film series’ close relationship to the Cressida Cowell novels is clearly one of its most crucial elements, and by paying homage to these and understanding what made them so successful has set the film’s up in the right manner.

How To Train Your Dragon 3

The Hidden World is no different and it’s incredibly lucid style, particularly when showing the Hidden World, is astounding, with the vibrancy of the colour palette genuinely first class. It’s tough to find flaws in the beautiful animation; yet this runs throughout, not just in the most vivid scenes.

And it’s this quality that persists, through the story, the voice acting, and naturally the animation, amalgamating into the final fully fledged picture. It’s easy to assess the film as any other, but being a family film, perhaps its most valuable asset is its pure radiance. There isn’t a level The Hidden World appears on, that doesn’t come across as pure fun.

It seems as if this is not just a wonderful film to watch, but one made with love and care, and without fear. Its sense of adventure and abandon is unparalleled, truly becoming the perfect finale for a wonderful trilogy. Maybe proposing it’s as good as Toy Story is a step too far, but in reality, there doesn’t actually seem to be any valid arguments against suggesting exactly that.

4/5

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