The Prodigy however, actively chooses to not forge its own path, becoming a horror of utmost reliability, basing all it does in moments seen constantly and continuously on the big screen

As The Hole In The Ground proved earlier this year, creating a film where a child becomes seemingly driven by paranormal forces can still be made into an original production. The Prodigy however, actively chooses to not forge its own path, becoming a horror of utmost reliability, basing all it does in moments seen constantly and continuously on the big screen.

Sarah (Taylor Schilling) and John’s (Peter Mooney) baby is born just as a notorious serial killer is caught and shot outside his home in Ohio. As young Miles grows up, his behaviour becomes increasingly creepy with signs that he is a uniquely intelligent child. When analysed by a specialist, Miles is believed to be possessed by an evil spirit controlling all of his actions. He must be hypnotised to remove the entity before he takes control forever, but that proves far easier said than done.

The Prodigy

For a feature as painfully repetitive as The Prodigy, it manages to survive criticism fairly well. Never does it attempt to do anything remarkable, but looks towards a structured story and a climactic end to supply short, sharp, entertainment. The Prodigy’s greatest asset becomes its self awareness of how average it is. There’s no suggestion that this is a brilliant production, it just gets on with the job.

With a suitable lead from Orange Is The New Black star Taylor Schilling, The Prodigy is a well managed, tight production, allowing her motherly tendencies to command the compassion of the story. Believing in Sarah’s motives, and understanding what drives her actions is vital to the film’s success, and despite Miles remaining the story’s key component, Schilling‘s performance is far more important.

With nothing remarkable and no outstanding moments, The Prodigy won’t live long in the memory, but while watching, engaging with the feature is far easier than it’s premise may lead anyone to believe. The Prodigy will have a tough time finding fans to recommend it, but those taking against it will be equally as rare.

2/5

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