Give it a chance and The Aeronauts entirely succeeds as a feature, but by analysing too intimately or with too much vigour, it does come away at the seams ever so slightly

Teaming up once again, this time with director Tom Harper of Wild Rose fame, Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones take flight in a feature far more expansive than it would perhaps first seem. Using powerful flashbacks and a love for close drama, The Aeronauts is a wonderful depiction of one man’s incredible ambition to predict the weather, and one woman’s fight against her past horrors to help him. Albeit short on story, the piece executes its flashbacks impressively, while utilising unique CGI to pave the way for a truly embracing story. 

James Glaisher (Eddie Redmayne) and Amelia Rennes (Felicity Jones) pair for a once-in-a-lifetime trip to reach higher than anyone has attempted before. Taking off from London, the pair are waved by an enormous crowd, but soon struggle to fight off the rapidly changing climate and terribly cold temperatures.

The Aeronauts 2

The lack of truth in the story is somewhat of an irritation, with Glaisher actually travelling with aide Henry Coxwell in the real scenario, but screenwriter Jack Thorne changed the truth, adding a modern feel to the story. It certainly makes it more cinematic, pushing past some of the gripes that come with a false story, becoming more of a fantastical fiction piece.

Certain moments of the feature are absolutely over the top, but that comes with the majority of modern dramas as they search for the ultimate cinematic experience; and Harper does manage to make a select few moments work particularly well, namely one in the first ten minutes that can only be described as a heart in the mouth experience.

Give it a chance and The Aeronauts entirely succeeds as a feature, but by analysing too intimately or with too much vigour, it does come away at the seams ever so slightly.

4/5

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